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Some Important Facts about One’s Kunyah

Dr. Abū Wāʾil Musa Shaleem

An informative background behind the longstanding Islamic tradition of utilising a kunyah and some common misconceptions surrounding it.

Although utilising a kunyah is an old practice and a well established Islamic tradition, its concept, its usage, and other aspects about it is still definitely alien to most Muslims. Therefore, this article will detail the most important facts about one’s kunyah. They are as follows:

Fact 1: A kunyah is generally any name that starts with Ab or Umm [i.e. father or mother], like Abū Ḥakīm [i.e. Ḥakīm’s father], Abū Khadījah [i.e. Khadījah’s father], Umm Ṣāliḥ [i.e. Ṣāliḥ’s mother], Umm Ḥafṣah [i.e. Ḥafṣah’s mother].

Fact 2: Arabic grammar governs the pronunciation and the spelling of a kunyah; therefore, a male’s kunyah may be pronounced and spelt—for example—as Abū ʿIyāḍ, Abā ʿIyāḍ, or Abī ʿIyāḍ. In this example, a person must say: “Abū ʿIyāḍ travelled to Riyadh” because Abū ʿIyāḍ is the subject of the verbal sentence in Arabic [i.e. سافر أبو عياض إلى الرياض], or he must say: “I saw Abā ʿIyāḍ today” because Abā ʿIyāḍ is the object of the verbal sentence in Arabic [i.e. رأيت أبا عياض اليوم], or he must say: “I gave salām to Abī ʿIyāḍ” because Abī ʿIyāḍ is preceded by a preposition in Arabic [i.e. سلمت على أبي عياض].

Similarly, a person must say: “Abū Jamīlah travelled to Riyadh” because Abū Jamīlah is the subject of the verbal sentence in Arabic [i.e. سافر أبو جميلة إلى الرياض], or he must say: “I saw Abā Jamīlah today” because Abā Jamīlah is the object of the verbal sentence in Arabic [i.e. رأيت أبا جميلة اليوم], or he must say: “I gave salām to Abī Jamīlah” because Abī Jamīlah is preceded by a preposition in Arabic [i.e. سلمت على أبي جميلة].

Therefore, the kunyah Abū ʿIyāḍ, Abā ʿIyāḍ, or Abī ʿIyāḍ refers to the same person, just as the kunyah Abū Jamīlah, Abā Jamīlah, or Abī Jamīlah refers to the same person; however, Arabic grammar causes the pronunciation and the spelling of a male’s kunyah to change drastically.

As for a female’s kunyah, like Umm ʿIyāḍ or Umm Jamīlah, then this drastic change of pronunciation and spelling does not occur.

Fact 3: The plural of kunyah (كُنْيَة) is kuná (كُنَى).

Fact 4: A kunyah fulfils the same function as a name which is to identify someone. Consequently, the scholars of Ḥadīth did not only author books about the names of the Ḥadīth narrators, but they also authored books about their kuná. Al-Asāmī Wa-al-Kuná—Names and Kuná—by Imām al-Ḥākim (d. 378 AH) (رحمه الله) is one such book. This was necessary because some narrators were either only mentioned by their kuná, or they are recognised easier by their kuná rather than their names, such as Al-Faḍl ibn Dakīn (d. 218 AH) (رحمه الله), one of Imām al-Bukhārī’s (رحمه الله) teachers. Imām al-Bukhārī (رحمه الله) seldom used his name when narrating from him; rather, Imām al-Bukhārī (رحمه الله) frequently used his kunyah, Abū Nuʿaym. Imām al-Bukhārī (رحمه الله) would frequently say: “Abū Nuʿaym reported to me that so and so reported to him…” Consequently, Al-Azdī (d. 374 AH) (رحمه الله) authored a book titled: Asmāʾ Man Uʿraf Bi Kunyahtihi, The Names of Those Who Were Known by Their Kuná. Therefore, a kunyah—just like a name—is used to identify someone.

Fact 5: Utilising kuná is an old Arab practice and is an established Islamic tradition, for many of the Prophet’s (صلى الله عليه وسلم) wives—for example—had a kunyah. ʿĀʾishah (رضي الله عنها) said: “You gave all your wives a kunyah except me. He said: ‘You are Umm ʿAbdillāh.’”[1] In fact, numerous Companions were only known by their kuná, likeAbū Ayyūb al-Anṣārī and Abū Mūsá al-Ashʿarī (رضي الله عنهما). Abū Ayyūb al-Anṣārī’s name was Khālid ibn Zayd, and Abū Mūsá al-Ashʿarī’s name was ʿAbdullāh ibn Qays.

Shaykh al-Albānī (رحمه الله) stated: “Having a kunyah is an Islamic practice which has no equal in other nations as far as I know. Therefore, every Muslim should adopt this practice.”[2]

Fact 6: Many Muslims, especially the non-Arab Muslims, have abandoned this Islamic practice.

Shaykh al-Albānī (رحمه الله) said:

Muslims, especially the non-Arab Muslims, have abandoned this Islamic practice. Therefore, you will notice that they rarely adopt a kunyah, even if they have several children, so how less so would it be for those who have no children at all. They have replaced the kunyah with innovated nicknames—like Al-Afnadī [A Greek word in its origin that means chief, gentleman, or sir], Al-Bayk [A Turkish word in its origin that means prince or sir], Al-Bāshā [A Turkish word in its origin that means lord], Al-Sayyid [which includes the meaning gentleman, master, lord, and ruler], Al-Ustādh [which means professor, teacher, or lecturer]—that may contain self-praise which is prohibited. So be conscious of this.[3]

Fact 7: Whenever the Arabs wanted to exalt and honour someone, the Arabs would address them by their kunyah rather than addressing them by their name or their nickname.

Ibn al-Qayyim (رحمه الله) stated: “A kunyah is used to praise, honour, and exalt a person, as the poet said: ‘I called him by his kunyah when I was addressing him to honour him.’”[4]

This fact impacts two important issues. They are:

Issue 1: Addressing a non-Muslim, an innovator, and a sinner by their existing kunyah or giving them a kunyah if they did not already have one. These individuals should not be given a kunyah, or they should not be addressed by their kuná if they had one, since honouring and exalting such people is impermissible. However, it is well established that some of these individuals had a kunyah, like Abū Lahab. Allāh said:

تَبَّتْ يَدَا أَبِي لَهَبٍ وَتَبَّ

“May the hands of Abū Lahab be ruined, and he was ruined.”
[Al-Masad, 111:1]

The scholars responded:

Response 1: Abū Lahab was only known by his kunyah; consequently, referring to him by his kunyah is allowed.

Response 2: Abū Lahab’s name was ʿAbd al-ʿUzzá which means the slave of Al-ʿUzzá, a tree the polytheists falsely worshipped during the pre-Islamic period, so he was addressed by his kunyah rather than his name because having a name that affirms servitude and sovereignty to anything other than Allāh is prohibited. However, others say his name was actually ʿAbd Manāf, but Manāf was actually an idol that was also falsely worshipped.

The Prophet’s (صلى الله عليه وسلم) uncle was also called Abū Tālib which is a kunyah, not a name. His name was also said to be ʿAbd Manāf; therefore, the scholars had an identical response.

In fact, the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave Abū Jahl this kunyah. Abū Jahl’s name was ʿAmr ibn Hishām ibn al-Mughīrah, and his original kunyah was Abū al-Ḥakam [Al-Ḥakam refers to wisdom and insight]. However, when ʿAmr ibn Hishām ibn al-Mughīrah was ignorant to the truth of Islām, the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave him a more appropriate kunyah to humiliate him.

Ibn al-Qayyim (رحمه الله) said: “The Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) called Abū al-Ḥakam Abū Jahl because he was ignorant to the truth.”[5]

The Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) himself also referred to ʿAbdullāh ibn Aubay, who eventually became the head of the hypocrites, by his kunyah—Abū Ḥubāb—because the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) was trying to soften his heart to embrace Islām. After the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) invited the non-Muslims of a gathering consisting of Muslims, Jews, and polytheists to embrace Islām, ʿAbdullāh ibn Abay said to him: “O man! There is nothing better than what you have said if it was true. Do not trouble us with your speech in our gathering. Return to your home, and if someone comes to you, teach him there.” The Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) eventually said to Saʿd ibn ʿUbādah (رضي الله عنه): “O Saʿd! Have you heard what Abū Ḥubāb said to me?”[6]

Ibn Baṭṭāl (d. 449 AH) (رحمه الله) commented: “This Ḥadīth proves that giving the polytheists kuná is allowed either to soften their hearts to embrace Islām or to soften their hearts to give [the Muslims] something beneficial that the polytheists may possess.”[7]

Therefore, if there is a need to address a non-Muslim, an innovator, or a sinner by their kunyah, then this is allowed; otherwise, doing so is impermissible, since using a kunyah involves praising and honouring a person, and such individuals should not be praised nor honoured.

Al-Nawawī (رحمه الله) said: “Chapter: The Permissibility of Addressing a non-Muslim, an Innovator, and a Sinner by Their Kunyah if They Are Only Known by Their Kuná or if Mentioning Their Names Will Cause Fitnah.”[8]

Issue 2: Using one’s kunyah to introduce oneself. This occurs frequently when meeting new people and when someone tries to identify themselves. This, however, is disliked since it involves self-praise, and if praising someone in their presence is disliked, then praising oneself is even worse. Abū Mūsá al-Ashʿarī (رضي الله عنه) narrated: “The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) heard a person lauding another person or praising him excessively. Thereupon, he (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: ‘You killed the man,’ or he (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: ‘You ruined the man.’”[9] However, if a person is only known by their kunyah or is recognised by their kunyah more than their actual name, then utilising their kunyah to introduce themself is allowed.

Ibn Ḥajar (رحمه الله) mentioned: “Utilising your kunyah to introduce yourself is disliked. However, if you are well known by your kunyah, using it to introduce yourself is allowed.”[10]

Al-Nawawī (رحمه الله) added: “Introducing yourself as Abū Fulān is allowed once you are not recognised by your name.”[11]

Fact 8: Although using the name of the oldest son is preferred, this is not mandatory.

Hāniʾ ibn Yazīd (رضي الله عنه) narrated:

The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) asked me: “Do you have any children?” I replied: “I have Shurayḥ, Muslim, and ʿAbdullāh.” The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) then asked: “Who is the oldest?” I replied: “Shurayḥ [is the oldest].” He (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “You are Abū Shurayḥ.”[12]

Fact 9: Although a person’s oldest son may be deceased, using his name is still preferred.

The Permanent Fatwá Committee stated: “Using the name of the oldest son, whether he is dead or alive, is better.”[13]

Fact 10: Using a female’s name—like Abū Maryam or Umm Maryam—is allowed, for many Companions’ kuná comprised of female names, like ʿUthmān ibn ʿAffān (رضي الله عنه). He had several kuná one of which was Abū Laylá.

Al-Nawawī (رحمه الله) mentioned:

Chapter: The Permissibility for a Man and a Woman to Use the Kunyah Abū Fulān or Abū Fulānah.

This is allowed, and many of the Noble Companions and the tābiʿīn had the kunyah Abū Fulānah, like ʿUthmān ibn ʿAffān (رضي الله عنه). He was Abū ʿAmr, Abū ʿAbdillāh, and Abū Laylá.[14]

Fact 11: If a person’s oldest child was conceived from adultery or fornication, he is generally prohibited from using this child’s name in his kunyah, as this is ascribing to an illegitimate offspring which is prohibited in Islām. This article provides more information on ascribing to an illegitimate offspring.

Fact 12: A person does not have to use any of his children’s names in his kunyah. Someone can be Abū Khālid or Umm Khālid, even though this person does not have a child named Khālid. This may occur if a person is called Abū Khālid or Umm Khālid before having children, yet this person never had a son, or he never named any of his sons Khālid.ʿUmar ibn al-Khaṭṭāb’s (رضي الله عنه) kunyah was Abū Ḥafṣ, yet he never had an offspring called Ḥafṣ.

Fact 13: Although a married person may not have had a child yet, he can still have a kunyah.

ʿAbdullāh ibn Masʿūd (رضي الله عنه) narrated: “The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave me the kunyah Abū ʿAbd al-Raḥmān before I even had a child.”[15] ʿAbdullāh ibn Masʿūd (رضي الله عنه) eventually had several children who include ʿAbd al-Raḥmān and Sārah.

Furthermore, Ḥamzah ibn Ṣuhayb (رحمه الله) reported:

Ṣuhayb (رضي الله عنه) was given the kunyah Abū Yaḥyá, so ʿUmar (رضي الله عنه) said to him: “Why are you called Abū Yaḥyá when you do not have a child?!” Ṣuhayb (رضي الله عنه) said: “Verily, Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave me the kunyah Abū Yaḥyá.”[16]

Ṣuhayb (رحمه الله) eventually had a son called Ḥamzah, the narrator of this Ḥadīth.

Shaykh al-Albānī (رحمه الله) said: “This Ḥadīth proves that a person who does not have a child [yet] is still allowed to have a kunyah.”[17]

Some scholars derived another benefit from this Ḥadīth. They said this Ḥadīth suggests that all the Companions or most of them only adopted a kunyah after having an offspring. Consequently, ʿUmar (رضي الله عنه) rebuked Ṣuhayb (رضي الله عنه) for adopting the kunyah Abū Yaḥyá. However, Ṣuhayb (رضي الله عنه) explained to ʿUmar (رضي الله عنه) that the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave him this kunyah which proves that having a kunyah is independent of having an offspring.

Badr al-Dīn al-ʿAynī (d. 855 AH) (رحمه الله) mentioned: “ʿUmar (رضي الله عنه) criticised Ṣuhayb (رحمه الله) for adopting a kunyah before having a child. This suggests that all the Companions or most of them only adopted a kunyah after having a child.”[18]

Fact 14: Anyone can have a kunyah, even if they never had any children, like ʿĀʾishah (رضي الله عنها). She said: “Allāh’s Messenger! All my co-wives have a kunyah [except me]. He said: ‘Take the kunyah Umm ʿAbdillāh.’”[19] ʿAbdullāh (رضي الله عنه) [i.e. ʿAbdullāh ibn al-Zubayr] was actually her nephew [i.e. Asmāʾ’s son/her sister’s son]. Therefore, having a kunyah is independent of having an offspring.

Fact 15: Giving a child a kunyah is allowed. Anas ibn Mālik (رضي الله عنه) relayed:

I had a brother, whom I think had been newly weaned. Whenever he was brought to the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم), the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) used to say: “O Abū ʿUmayr! What did you do with the nightingale [A nightingale is a small species of bird, and Anas’ brother would play with one during his brother’s infancy.]?”[20]

Also, Umm Khālid bint Khālid (رضي الله عنها) reported:

The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) was given some clothes including a small black cloak. He said: “To whom shall we give this to wear?” The people kept silent, so the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “Fetch me Umm Khālid.” I was brought to the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) [i.e. because she was a child]. He grabbed the small black cloak and made me wear it.[21]

In another version of this Ḥadīth, Umm Khālid bint Khālid (رضي الله عنها) reported: “I was a child when I came to Madīnah from Ethiopia. Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) made me wear a cloak with patterns on it.”[22]

Children were given a kunyah in the hope that they would live to have children of their own and to prevent them from acquiring offensive alqāb [i.e. the plural of laqab which means nickname], since the one who carries a kunyah is not usually given a nickname.

Badr al-Dīn al-ʿAynī (d. 855 AH) (رحمه الله) stated: “The scholars say: ‘Children are given a kunyah in the hope that they would live to have children of their own and to prevent them from acquiring offensive nicknames.’”[23]

Fact 16: Having multiple kuná is allowed, for ʿUthmān ibn ʿAffān (رضي الله عنه) had multiple kuná. ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (رضي الله عنه) also had several kuná. He, however, preferred the kunyah Abū Turāb since the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave him this kunyah.

Sahl ibn Saʿd (رضي الله عنه) narrated:

Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) went to Fāṭima’s (رضي الله عنها) house but did not find ʿAlī (رضي الله عنه) there, so the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) asked her: “Where is your cousin?” She replied: “We had a disagreement, so he did not nap at home because he was upset.” Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) asked someone to look for him. That person returned saying: “O Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم)! ʿAlī (رضي الله عنه) is sleeping in the masjid.” Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) went and saw ʿAlī (رضي الله عنه) lying on the floor. His upper garment fell to one side of his body, and he was covered with dust. Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) started cleaning the dust from his body saying: “Wake up! O Abū Turāb. Wake up! O Abū Turāb.”[24]

Ibn al-Qayyim (رحمه الله) said: “Although ʿAlī’s (رضي الله عنه) kunyah was Abū al-Ḥasan, the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) gave him the kunyah Abū Turāb, and ʿAlī (رضي الله عنه) preferred this kunyah.”[25]

Imām al-Bukhārī (رحمه الله) mentioned the aforementioned Ḥadīth in the chapter: “Carrying the Kunyah Abū Turāb while having Another Kunyah.”[26] Furthermore, Ibn Ḥajar (رحمه الله)—supporting this view—stated: “From the derived benefits of this Ḥadīth is that a person can have numerous kuná.”[27]

Fact 17: Although the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) prohibited the Companions from using his kunyah—Abū al-Qāsim—some scholars allow its use after his death because the reason for this prohibition is now non-existent. The Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “Name yourselves after me, but do not refer to yourselves by my kunyah.”[28]

Shaykh Ibn Bāz (رحمه الله) mentioned:

The scholars understood that this meant that this was forbidden during the Prophet’s (صلى الله عليه وسلم) lifetime, since the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) may think that he was being addressed when in fact someone else was being addressed. Therefore, naming yourselves after the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) is allowed. However, the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) initially prohibited the use of his kunyah but then allowed ʿAlī (رضي الله عنه) to use it after his death, and this allowance is also applicable to us.[29]

Imām al-Shāfiʿī (رحمه الله), Ibn al-Qayyim (رحمه الله), and several others said using the kunyah Abū al-Qāsim is still prohibited. Others said the prohibition only applies when someone names his son Muḥammad and gives him the kunyah Abū al-Qāsim. Other scholars held a fourth opinion. Since the scholars differ gravely over the use of this kunyah, avoiding it altogether is definitely safer.

Fact 18: Changing one’s kunyah is allowed if a need arises, for the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) changed Abū al-Ḥakam’s (رضي الله عنه) kunyah to Abū Shurayḥ. Hāniʾ ibn Yazīd reported:

When my people and I visited Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم), Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) heard them calling me Abū al-Ḥakam, so he (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said to me: “Allāh is Al-Ḥakam [i.e The Judge], and judgement belongs to Him. Why are you called Abū al-Ḥakam?” I replied: “When my people disagree about a matter, they come to me, and I judge between them, and both parties are satisfied with my decision.” The Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “This is beautiful!” He (صلى الله عليه وسلم) then asked: “Do you have any children?” I replied: “I have Shurayḥ, Muslim, and ʿAbdullāh.” The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) then asked: “Who is the oldest?” I replied: “Shurayḥ [is the oldest].” He (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “You are Abū Shurayḥ.”[30]

As for changing a kunyah that contains a girl’s name to one that contains a boy’s name which is the case if someone had a daughter first then a son, then this is unnecessary, especially if this person was well known by his initial kunyah. Therefore, if you were known as Abū Asmāʾ or Umm Asmāʾ, you do not have to change your kunyah to Abū Masʿūd or Umm Masʿūd because your oldest son is Masʿūd.

Fact 19: The general guidelines that apply for naming someone typically apply here also. The aforementioned Ḥadīth proves this. Therefore, one should avoid using, for example, any kunyah that has a distasteful meaning or contains a name specific to Allāh, like Al-Ḥakam.

Fact 20: Sometimes, a laqab [i.e. nickname] may resemble a kunyah because of the use of the word Ab or Umm, like Abū al-Rijāl (رحمه الله). Abū al-Rijāl—a renowned Ḥadīth narrator—was Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd al-Raḥmān, and his kunyah was Abū ʿAbd al-Raḥmān. He was given the nickname Abū al-Rijāl which means the father of the men because he had ten sons.

Abū Hurayrah is a more popular example. The word hurayrah originates from the word hirrah which means a female cat. However, whenever the word hirrah is altered to hurayrah, it means a small female cat which is a kitten. Abū Hurayrah’s name was actually ʿAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Ṣakhar al-Dawsī, but he was given the nickname Abū Hurayrah which resembles a kunyah because of the use of the word Ab.

Shaykh Muḥammad Ādam al-Ityūbī (رحمه الله) explains: “Abū Hurayrah is not a real kunyah; it is a nickname that resembles a kunyah.”[31]

ʿAbdullāh ibn Rāfiʿ (رحمه الله) relayed the origin of this nickname. He said:

I said to Abū Hurayrah (رضي الله عنه): “Why were you given the nickname Abū Hurayrah?” He said: “Do you respect me?” I said: “Indeed, I respect you.” He said: “I used to tend to my family’s sheep, and I would play with a kitten during the day and would place it in a tree at night, so they called me Abū Hurayrah.”[32]

However, the Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) would often abbreviate this nickname. Abū Hurayrah (رضي الله عنه) himself narrated that Allāh’s Messenger (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said to him: “O Abū Hirr, where were you?”[33]

This concludes this article detailing some important facts about one’s kunyah, and all praise is due to Allāh by Whose grace good deeds are completed.

Endnotes:
[1] Reported by Ibn Mājah (3739) with this exact wording, and Shaykh al-Albānī authenticated it.
[2] Silsilah al-Aḥādith al-Ṣaḥīḥah, vol. 1, pg. 257.
[3] Silsilah al-Aḥādith al-Ṣaḥīḥah, vol. 1, pg. 111.
[4] Tuḥfah al-Mawlūd, pg. 135.
[5] Zād al-Maʿād, vol. 2, pg. 309.
[6] Reported by al-Bukhārī ((4566) and (5663) and (6207) and (6254)) and Muslim (1798).
[7] Ṣharḥ Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī, vol. 9, pg. 355.
[8] Al-Adhkār, pg. 296.
[9] Reported by al-Bukhārī ((2663) and (6060)) and Muslim (3001).
[10] Fatḥ al-Bārī, vol. 10, pg. 582.
[11] Ṣharḥ Ṣaḥīḥ Muslim, vol. 14, pg. 135.
[12] Reported by Abū Dāwūd (4900) and al-Nasāʾī (5387), and Shaykh al-Albānī authenticated it.
[13] Fatāwá al-Lajnah al-Dāʾimah, vol. 11, pg 487.
[14] Al-Adhkār, pg. 296.
[15] Reported by al-Ḥākim (5432), and Shaykh Muqbil deemed it authentic.
[16] Reported by Aḥmad ((23926) and (23929)) and al-Ḥākim in al-Mustadrak ((5701) and (7739)), and Shaykh al-Albānī and Shaykh Muqbil deemed it authentic.
[17] Silsilah al-Aḥādith al-Ṣaḥīḥah, vol. 1, pg. 110.
[18] Nukhab al-Afkār, vol. 14, pg. 246.
[19] Reported by Abū Dāwūd (4970) with this exact wording, and Shaykh al-Albānī deemed it authentic.
[20] Reported by al-Bukhārī (6203) and Muslim (2150).
[21] Reported by al-Bukhārī (5823) and (5845).
[22] Reported by al-Bukhārī (3874).
[23] ʿUmdah al-Qārī, vol. 22, pg. 213.
[24] Reported by al-Bukhārī ((441) and (6280)) and Muslim (2409).
[25] Zād al-Maʿād, vol. 2, pg. 314.
[26] Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī, vol. 8, pg. 45.
[27] Fatḥ al-Bārī, vol. 10, pg. 588.
[28] Reported by al-Bukhārī ((3538) and (110)) and Muslim ((2131) and (2133) and (2134)).
[29] حكم التسمي باسم النبي صلى الله عليه وسلم والتكني بكنيته
[30] Reported by Abū Dāwūd (4900) and al-Nasāʾī (5387), and Shaykh al-Albānī graded it authentic.
[31] Qurrah ʿIyn al-Muḥtāj, vol. 1, pg. 481.
[32] Reported by al-Tirmidhī (3840), and Shaykh al-Albānī graded it authentic.
[33] Reported by al-Bukhārī (6246). See also Ṣaḥīḥ al-Bukhārī ((285) and (5375) and (6452)).

Written by: Abū Wāʾil Musa Shaleem

Published: May 12, 2023
Edited: May 13, 2023

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